New York assisted suicide bill draws fire from disability rights group

Tue, Apr 24th 2018 04:00 pm
Catholic News Agency  [ View Original Article ]

NEW YORK CITY (CNA/EWTN News) - Disability rights activists are speaking out in opposition to a proposal in New York that would legalize physician assisted suicide.

The Medical Aid in Dying Act, or bill A.2383-A, would amend the current public health law to legalize assisted suicide for mentally competent, terminally ill patients in the state of New York. The bill was heard in the New York Assembly Health Committee on Monday, where a number of opposing groups testified against it.

"The mere suggestion that disability acquired as the result of illness is cause enough to end one's life is a devaluation of disabled peoples' lives, and it's offensive," said Kathryn Carroll, an attorney and policy analyst with the Center for Disability Rights, who was invited to testify at Monday's hearing.

"Our focus should be on expanding access to services and supports that allow people to live with dignity, rather than assisting their suicide," Carroll continued.

She warned of the danger posed by economic incentives for insurance companies and caregivers to push assisted suicide on the terminally ill as the cheaper option, instead of longer term end-of-life care.

"As long as these external influences exist, the promise of a choice to end one's life is a lie," Carroll said.

Carroll was joined by other disability advocates, including Mel Tanzman, the executive director of Westchester Disabled on the Move and the chair of the health committee at the New York Association on Independent Living.

Tanzman gave his testimony on Monday on behalf of over 40 organizations who serve individuals with disabilities in the state of New York.

"Fears of becoming disabled and facing functional loss, whether the cause is injury or illness, are often reported by doctors as reasons patients request assisted suicide in states where it is legal," Tanzman said.

"The disability community strongly opposes the belief that requiring the assistance of another individual for activities of daily living, such as dressing, bathing and toileting, is undignified or a legitimate reason for New York State to legalize physician assisted suicide," he continued.

Tanzman additionally pointed to the possibility of "coercion and abuse" in such legislation, noting reports that similar assisted suicide measures in other states have experienced "ineffectual safeguards" against abuses for the terminally ill or disabled.

The bill's New York City hearing is scheduled to take place on May 3, where Not Dead Yet, a disability rights activist group, will be testifying.

The Medical Aid in Dying Act is not the first attempt to legalize physician assisted suicide within New York. Last fall, an appeals court in the state ruled against a lawsuit which stated that citizens have a right to choose doctor-assisted suicide.

The lawsuit claimed that the state's law against helping another individual commit suicide does not apply to doctor-assisted death, arguing that the ban on physician assisted suicide is unconstitutional because it denies patients the right to self-determination.

However, seven judges of the New York Court of Appeals unanimously shut down the case, saying the current law against assisting with suicide did not make exceptions for doctors. The judges also said the measure would induce undue pressure on terminal patients to end their lives.

Physician assisted suicide is now legal in a handful of states, including California, Colorado, Oregon, Vermont and Washington.

 

Related Articles

comments powered by Disqus